17 Edible Weeds With Extraordinary Health Benefits In Your Garden

17 Edible Weeds With Extraordinary Health Benefits In Your Garden

#11 Red Clover (Trifolium Pretense)


Red Clover contains a source of calcium, chromium, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, and vitamin C. Because it’s also a rich in isoflavones, chemicals that act like estrogens in the body, go easy on your intake. Small amounts of raw clover leaves or flowers can be added to salads, sautéed, or pan-roasted.

#12 Sheep Sorrel (Rumex Acetosella)


A good source of vitamin C and E, sheep sorrel has been used to treat inflammation, diarrhea, and even scurvy. It’s also used to treat urinary tract infections, maintain blood sugar levels, and support the liver. Because of the potassium oxalate levels, this weed shouldn’t be eaten in excess but small amounts liven up soups, salads, and stir-fries with their lemony and tart taste. It’s also fantastic when paired with seafood or chicken.

#13 Stinging Nettle (Urtica Dioica)


Stinging Nettle is Another popular medicinal weed. It’s used for urination problems and kidney stones, joint ailments, and as a diuretic. The leaves are also said to help fight allergies and hay fever. Nettles are rich in vitamins A, B2, C, D, and K and have important nutrients like antioxidants, amino acids, and chlorophyll. They’re also a good source of calcium, potassium, iodine, manganese, and especially iron.

#14 Wild Amaranth (Amaranthus)


This summer annual weed is a great source of free protein. The leaves of wild amaranth are delicious and delicately flavored when pan-fried, or added to any dish that calls for leafy greens. Cooked amaranth leaves contain vitamin A, vitamin C, and folate; with lesser amounts of thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin, and some minerals such as calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper, and manganese.

#15 Wild Garlic (Allium Ursinum)


Wild garlic with delicate white flowers and thin shoots, this useful ‘weed’ is delicious when used in a homemade pesto. It can also be used in place of chives or green onion and added to salads, sandwiches, and soups. Just like the garlic, we’re used to buying in the store, the wild variety also boasts antibacterial, antibiotic, antiseptic, and antifungal properties. Of all the garlic, wild garlic has been found to have the greatest ability to lower blood pressure.

#16 Wild Violets (Viola)


The mild-tasting leaves and stems can be eaten either raw or cooked. Leaves can be dried for a tea that has mild laxative qualities and the flowers can be added to vinegar for a homemade dressing, or simply sprinkled on salads.

#17 Wood Sorrel (Oxalis Montana)


These leaves are high in vitamin C and have diuretic and cooling properties meaning they are useful to treat urinary tract infections and fevers. Wood sorrel is also used for indigestion or as an appetite stimulant. As the stems are difficult to chew, it’s best to just enjoy the leaves, flowers, and seedpods, which have a mild lemony taste. Wood sorrel works well with fish and in salads.

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